10 Quotes Worth Re-Visiting

10 Quotes Worth Re-Visiting

The Daily Dispatch

The Big Leap by Gay Hendricks is one of my favorites. I first read it in 2010, and it's been with me through the years. I've recommended it to friends, clients and colleagues.

A great book to nurturing our inner potential and spending more time in our 'zone of genius'. It discusses the 'upper limit' problem - that when we attain higher levels of success, we tend to self-sabotage to prevent enjoyment of that success.

Highlighted quotes from the Big Leap:

  • "If I argue for my limitations, I get to keep them. Ultimately we have to ask ourselves, “What’s the payoff for arguing forcefully for our limitations?"
  • “Fear is excitement without the breath... the very same mechanisms that produce excitement also produce fear, and any fear can be transformed into excitement by breathing fully with it."
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Behind every communication problem is a sweaty ten-minute conversation you don’t want to have. 
  • ".. gifted and talented children. They get a lot of their parents’ attention, but they also get a strong subliminal message along with it: don’t shine too much, or you’ll make others feel bad or look bad."
  • If you don’t realize that each person is a 100 percent entity, you’re left with the impossible task of apportioning 100 percent among the participants in the conflict.
  • "When you hide feelings inside yourself, you start seeing them in other people."
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Arguments are caused by two people (or two countries) racing to occupy the victim position in the relationship. 
  • "Two people may be locked in an angry conflict for weeks. When they get beneath the roiled surface of the issue, however, they discover that the real issue is that they’re both sad about something they’ve both kept hidden.
  • "An attitude of playful wonder is characteristic of people when they’re operating in the Zone of Genius. Your sincere commitment is the entry gate."
  • Relationship is the ultimate spiritual path, because it constantly presents us with the challenge to love and embrace in the very situations in which we’re most prone to shun and reject.